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Bluegrass Care Navigators Begins Dementia Support Program

The Bluegrass Transitional Care Dementia Program provides nursing support to people with Alzheimer’s who live alone, and those who have intellectual or developmental disabilities with Alzheimer’s disease. The program aims to reduce hospitalizations, emergency department visits and institutionalizations for those living with Alzheimer’s disease and dementia.

Additionally, the organization will provide training to help caregivers cope with the stress of caregiving responsibilities. By developing tools to manage stress and finding selfcare, caregivers should experience reduced feelings of burden and depression.

The program is home-based and lasts six months, with each family supported by a home coach. The home coach will make up to nine visits and provide ongoing support via telephone, while volunteers will give companionship and support with individual needs and interests.

Bluegrass Care Navigators is starting the program in Fayette, Jessamine, Franklin, Woodford, Anderson, Scott, Perry, Leslie, Letcher and Knott counties, with plans to expand to additional counties in early 2021. Caregivers or diagnosed individuals interested in the program can call 877.439.0262 or email Jennifer King at jking@bgcarenav.org.

“Our major goal is to support caregivers, and help families avoid institutionalization of loved ones living with Alzheimer’s or dementia,” said Susan Swinford, Bluegrass Care Navigators Vice President of Administration. “With our team of physicians, nursing professionals, social workers and chaplains, and with our strong healthcare partners across the state, Bluegrass Care Navigators is uniquely positioned to address these special needs.”

The program is made possible by a $1 million grant from award from the federal Administration for Community Living/Administration on Aging, under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Bluegrass Care Navigators is one of 13 organizations in the nation awarded the grant and the only one in Kentucky.

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